Month: April 2017

Stage Review : To Sir, With Love at Birmingham’s Repertory Theatre, UK

The book To Sir, With Love was set not long after the end of WWII in London’s East End. This powerful, autobiographical story by novelist E R Brathwaite is about education, schooling, social divide, and narrow minded attitudes that were entrenched in people both in-school and on the outside. The main theme however, is the racial discrimination against black folks and against those neither black nor white children born to parents with ethnicity that they do not share. Arguably the story made more famous by the film starring actor Sidney Poitier and singer, Lulu, because the film sucked in a 1960’s vibe which people could relate to. Largely because the comprehensive system had kicked in by the end of that decade, so, perhaps, allowed for a degree of creative license to tell the tale with more ‘swing’. This production however, brings the story right back to its original post war placing, only this time it’s an inner-city school in Birmingham, West Midlands.  The period setting is slightly confused and I wonder where the misinterpretation comes …

Belgrade Theatre announces 11 Million Reasons to Dance for International Dance Day

To celebrate International Dance Day, tomorrow, Saturday 29 April, the Belgrade Theatre, Coventry has announced its photography exhibition 11 Million Reasons to Dance which is currently on display at the theatre. 11 Million Reasons to Dance is an exhibition inspired by iconic dance scenes from film, all reimagined by deaf and disabled people who dance. The title of the exhibition reflects the fact there are more than 11 million disabled people in the UK. The exhibition presents a series of thought-provoking takes on cinematic set-pieces, for example: Singing in the Rain and Billy Elliot. With support from Unlimited Impact, People Dancing, the UK development organisation and membership body for participatory dance, commissioned emerging photographer, Sean Goldthorpe to work with the dancers to create 20 high quality images. A UK and world tour is now bringing these subtly captured moments of dance magic to a bigger arts audience and wider public, aiming to move the viewer with their style, passion and provocative wit, challenging us all to appreciate the energy, creativity and diversity of deaf and …

Review : Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap (PS4)

Sharing a review of Wonder Boy on the Playstation 4 by Games Centre at METRO Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap (PS4) – a masterful remake The Sega Master System classic makes an unexpected return, with some of the best graphics you’ll see all year. It’s easy to get cynical about the seemingly endless stream of remasters and remakes. When they’re dredging up no-name tosh like Voodoo Vince it feels like there’s… via Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap review – retro master remake — Metro

Profiling artist Colin Thompson

About Colin Thompson London born, Thompson is an artist, writer and illustrator. After art training and subsequent employment as a graphic designer in the UK, and later, time spent in film making for the BBC., Thompson has enjoyed a full career in the creative industry which has involved living and working abroad. Thompson gained a dual citizenship after moving to Australia in the mid nineties Black and White Thompson’s background in design and print meant that he was always able to create very detailed black & white drawings. In 1990 he wrote his first two children’s books, both were published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1991 as small hardbacks and included thirty or so black and white illustrations. Since then, award winner Thompson has written and illustrated over 70 children’s books which have been published in many countries over the world. Grayscale and Half Tones It was only going to be a matter of time before Thompson would see an opening for him in this latest colouring book for adults craze. Colin Thompson’s Colouring Book (suitable …

Short Reviews of two ‘Best of British’ Ravensburger jigsaw puzzles

Notably it is Artist, Geoff Tristram who contributes designs for all from the ‘Best of British’ Ravensburger Puzzles. ‘Used Car Lot’ (see images above) is No 18 from this comic style series. The picture to compile, using 1000 quality pieces, is really colourful. The jokes on the signage are so relevant to the stereo typifying of a, shall we say, less than scrupulous Used Car Sales operation. The tongue in cheek humour is all aplenty and doing this puzzle will make any dull day a bit brighter. Click below to read another short review previously published of The Supermarket another from this popular set which is equally amusing Source: Short Review of Best of British – The Supermarket jigsaw puzzle

Book Review – The Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid’s Tale Hardcover: 318 pages Author: Margaret Atwood Illustrations by: Anna and Elena Balbusso Published by The Folio Society 2012 – Second printing 2017 RRP £38.95 An Adult Fictional Book – Classic Dystopian Themed Novel/Speculative Fiction OVERVIEW The Handmaid’s Tale has been in print for over 30 years so this review is more an evaluation of the second printing 2017 by The Folio Society, London, which includes some fabulous illustrations and is introduced by the author. As with most dystopian themed classics, this too, is chillingly prophetic. In this strange world, the narrator, Offred is a Handmaid in service to the Republic of Gilead (a country that stands in the place of what was the USA) in a future near. Gilead is built around a single goal: the control of reproduction. Political subjugation creates a society in which women are treated as subhuman. The Wives, Handmaids (and the Marthas) serve their husbands, the military Commanders and their households in one way or another. The state tackles the problem of the decrease in birth rates by …